A Short History of the Science vs Religion Debate

The ‘Conflict Model’   The first work on the history of science and religion that utilized what came to be known as the ‘conflict model’ was written by an early American photographer, John William Draper, who had been invited to write a polemic for Popular Science magazine criticizing Roman Catholic doctrines. The conflict model is… Continue reading A Short History of the Science vs Religion Debate

Neo-Darwinism as an Inherently Anti-Evolutionary Stance

It’s a truism that the more alike people, groups, or views are, the more vehemently they are likely to argue about the differences. Although, like most truisms, it’s not always actually true, as a generalization it does more often fit that its inverse. The supposed argument between ‘science’ and ‘religion’ is one of those situations.… Continue reading Neo-Darwinism as an Inherently Anti-Evolutionary Stance

A Few Statements To Think On

Consider the possibility that the following quotes, in their essential meaning, all say the same, and what that implies: “Christ is fully human and fully divine.” – Council of Trent “Whenever two or more of you gather in the name of love, I am already with you.” – Jesus, in the Gospels “If Jesus were… Continue reading A Few Statements To Think On

Why Those Trained in Literature (particularly poetry) Make Good Critics of Scientific Notions

One of the best ways to train the mind in terms of critiquing science, aside from philosophy and critical thinking, is poetry. The reason is simple: poets are experts on metaphor.   Scientific explanation, in the sense that it attempts to describe an (actually) impossible potential perspective (how things are for themselves and each other, rather… Continue reading Why Those Trained in Literature (particularly poetry) Make Good Critics of Scientific Notions

Mathematical Certainty, Its Basic Assumptions and the Truth-Claim of Modern Science

The pitfalls of a pseudo-mathematical method, which can make no progress except by making everything a function of a single variable and assuming that all the partial differentials vanish, could not be better illustrated. For it is no good to admit later on that there are in fact other variables, and yet to proceed without… Continue reading Mathematical Certainty, Its Basic Assumptions and the Truth-Claim of Modern Science

Positing the Presuppositions, and the Presuppositions of Cartesian Science

We should introduce here a precise distinction between the presupposed or shadowy part of what appear as ontic objects and the ontological horizon of their appearing. On the one hand, as was brilliantly developed by Husserl in his phenomenological analysis of perception, every perception of even an ordinary object involves a series of assumptions about… Continue reading Positing the Presuppositions, and the Presuppositions of Cartesian Science

Injected, Inspected, Detected, Infected, Neglected and Selected

Originally posted on The Weekly Squeak:
Howdy!   If you want to know some cool history of Smalltalk, and perhaps this is a strong argument in actually *being* a Smalltalk and not trying to distance yourself from that rich and lovely heritage…. anyway, here goes:   On 04/28/2014 08:14 PM, Alain Busser wrote: > Also,…