Thoughts on “God, Human Memory and the Certainty of Geometry” by Marc Champagne

The Cartesian Claim and the Reproof It seems to me that Mr. Champagne has thoroughly buried Descartes’ claim that an atheist cannot know geometry. However, because the paper remains on a superficial level of insight into the situation, the independent existence of God, whether believed in or not, remains a necessary condition. Thus the claim… Continue reading Thoughts on “God, Human Memory and the Certainty of Geometry” by Marc Champagne

Why Belief is a Problem

It is precisely through belief that we come to the idea that we can determine things to a fuller extent than we actually can. Whether this determination regards the nature of reality-as-a-whole, the nature of god, or a determination of who someone is based on race, gender, class, or any other partial determination, it remains… Continue reading Why Belief is a Problem

The Imaginary Real and the Actualized Virtual, or Why Development is Difficult

We move between the imaginary and the actual all the time in acting and in knowing, insofar as any knowing is already an acting. We do this in two main ways: 1. Taking the actual into the imagination as knowledge of it. Aristotle called this form of knowing episteme, and it is for most people… Continue reading The Imaginary Real and the Actualized Virtual, or Why Development is Difficult

Christ as History: Fr. Bernard Lonergan’s Christology, Part One

One wonders what Fr. Bernard Lonergan would have made of the short text we have known as the “gospel according to Mary Magdalen”, specifically the lords of the underworld (or lowlands) apparently revealed to her by the quasi-historical person we know as Jesus.  The first of these was known as Christ While historians are still… Continue reading Christ as History: Fr. Bernard Lonergan’s Christology, Part One

Techne and Poiesis; Techne and Episteme

(a response to an email from Ian Delairre) In this case I’m using the term poiesis in a fairly simple way, as anything that self-develops, rather than something that is developed intentionally, generally by man. Technology is an obvious case of techne, but if technology itself grows and develops, and is therefore not “controllable” (as… Continue reading Techne and Poiesis; Techne and Episteme

Mythos, Metaphysics, Technology, Science: Techne and Episteme.

I’ve been thinking about the relation between the epistemological and the technological a fair amount. As a mode of doing, techne is usually opposed with poiesis. However as a mode of knowing, its opposite was episteme. The basic difference between techne and episteme as knowing is temporal – techne looks forward, and tends therefore to… Continue reading Mythos, Metaphysics, Technology, Science: Techne and Episteme.